SR20 top mount manifolds - S-Chassis.com


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Old 03-07-2007, 04:26 PM   #1  
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SR20 top mount manifolds

I am gonna be doing a turbo upgrade within a few months, and I might go with a top mount manifold....

I notice there are fewer available options than with the standard manifold...

So far I have found the following:

PeakBoost ~830 at heavythrottle.com
Turbofab ~430 at heavythrottle.com (but wont get this, bc it is log style, not tubular)
Ichiba ~350 at hopupracing.com (tubular, price seems to good to be true)
Hybridynamics.com ~850 looks really nice, custom fabbed
SSAutochrome ~200 I have heard they are cheap
TuneAgent.com ~400 appears to be an Australian company


Any input would be GREATLY appreciated....I don't wanna cheap out on a manifold that's just gonna crack or whatever....

Thanks
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Old 03-07-2007, 05:54 PM   #2  
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def. dont get SSAutochrome..everyones thats gotten that crap has said it cracks.

btw..where at in NJ you located at?
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Old 03-07-2007, 06:17 PM   #3  
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hmmmm


not true

first gen ssac yea not second. made with better steel and braced.

have been boosting with track/street** events since Aug 06 no issue.
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Old 03-07-2007, 06:44 PM   #4  
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I'm in south jersey.....

I am almost tempted to buy one of the cheaper tubular design manifolds....

If the shape and design of the manifolds are identical, the only likely difference is the quality of the material and strength of the bonds....

It's like screw it buy it and if it breaks, just buy another one....

The good ones cost >$800 and the cheap ones are <$400

More input!!!!! Thanks
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Old 03-07-2007, 08:30 PM   #5  
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I think the cheaper ones will hold up but it just depends on how much you "beat" on the car, boost, etc. Ive seen the SS Auto items actually hold up.

But in the long run if you do drop the $400 +/- and it does crack and you end up having to buy a new one, you might as well have saved up and shelled out the loot for the High-end Manifold.

I think you should just get something reasonably priced, and what matches your set-up the best.
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Old 03-26-2007, 10:59 PM   #6  
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check the thickness of the walls...
and check for the rigidity and quality of the welds...

ssautochrome is paper thin..
compare that to the peakboost manifold
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Old 03-30-2007, 03:40 PM   #7  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Biggamehit View Post



first gen ssac yea not second. made with better steel and braced.
Bigg would you know what the AISI steel rating is that they use for the second gen ss auto chrome???? I'm assuming chromolly for bending and tensile strength, but I know that chromolly is subdivided below 40 carbons. I'm assuming the first gen was a 4130 steel.
Never mind T304 stainless is used, it took me an hour to find it on the website...
I thougt I would look up in wikipedia why there were so many complaints on the headesr cracking, I know it is mostly do to it's composition to welds and temprature so I thought I would look it up. I can't speak this in laymens terms so I just quoted it from wiki.
Quote:
Originally Posted by wikipedia

Intergranular corrosion
Some compositions of stainless steel are prone to intergranular corrosion when exposed to certain environments. When heated to around 700 C, chromium carbide forms at the intergranular boundaries, depleting the grain edges of chromium, impairing their corrosion resistance. Steel in such condition is called sensitized. Steels with carbon content 0.06% undergo sensitization in about 2 minutes, while steels with carbon content under 0.02% are not sensitive to it.


A special case of intergranular corrosion is called 'weld decay' or 'knifeline attack'(KLA). Due to the elevated temperatures of welding the stainless steel can be sensitized very locally along the weld. The chromium depletion creates a galvanic couple with the well-protected alloy nearby in highly corrosive environments. As the name 'knifeline attack' implies, this is limited to a small zone, often only a few micrometres across, which causes it to proceed more rapidly. This zone is very near the weld, making it even less noticeable[5].

It is possible to reclaim sensitized steel by heating it to above 1000 C and holding at this temperature for a given period of time dependent on the mass of the piece, followed by quenching it in water. This process dissolves the carbide particles, then keeps them in solution.

It is also possible to stabilize the steel to avoid this effect and make it welding-friendly. Addition of titanium, niobium and/or tantalum serves this purpose; titanium carbide, niobium carbide and tantalum carbide form preferentially to chromium carbide, protecting the grains from chromium depletion. Use of extra-low carbon steels is another method and modern steel production usually ensures a carbon content of <0.03% at which level intergranular corrosion is not a problem. Light-gauge steel also does not tend to display this behavior, as the cooling after welding is too fast to cause effective carbide formation.

Crevice corrosion
In the presence of reducing acids or exposure to reducing atmosphere, the passivation layer protecting steel from corrosion can break down. This wear can also depend on the mechanical construction of the parts, eg. under gaskets, in sharp corners, or in incomplete welds. Such crevices may promote corrosion, if their size allows penetration of the corroding agent but not its free movement. The mechanism of crevice corrosion is similar to pitting corrosion, though it happens at lower temperatures.

Stress corrosion cracking
Stress corrosion cracking can be a severe form of stainless steel corrosion. It forms when the material is subjected to tensile stress and some corrosive environments, especially chloride-rich environments (sea water) at higher temperatures. The stresses can be a result of service loads, or can be caused by the type of assembly or residual stresses from fabrication (eg. cold working); residual stresses can be relieved by annealing. This limits the usefulness of stainless steels of the 300 series (304, 316) for containing water with higher than few ppm content of chlorides at temperatures above 50 C. In more aggressive conditions, higher alloyed austenitic stainless steels (6% Mo grades) or Mo containing duplex stainless steels may be selected.

Stress corrosion cracking depends on the nickel content. High nickel content austenitic (non-magnetic) steels, which are the most resistant to other forms of corrosion, tend to be the most susceptible to stress corrosion.

Chlorine catalyzes the formation of hydrogen which hardens and embrittles the metal locally, causing concentration of the stress and a microscopic crack. The chlorine moves into the crack, continuing the process.
I wouldn't recommend using for welding. A lot of shops have moved on to using 4130~4140 chromolly for it's much more durable tensile strength and less stress.
Not only does ssauto chrome have problems with cracking,but if you look back in history a bit to when Greddy manufactured the KA24de headers they where prone to cracking. Greddy stopped shelving the headers due to there numerous complaints.

AISI steel ratings from wiki.....
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AISI_steel_grades

Last edited by BigVinnie; 03-30-2007 at 04:32 PM. Reason: Needed to clarify indepth information and correct steel ratings.
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Old 03-30-2007, 05:41 PM   #8  
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good stuff bro ..

yea i didnt even research that. i just went with it to get by and it has laster with the additional bracing.
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Old 03-30-2007, 06:09 PM   #9  
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Originally Posted by Biggamehit View Post
good stuff bro ..

yea i didnt even research that. i just went with it to get by and it has laster with the additional bracing.
I always research the steel compounds used on products. You won't believe how many after market products shouldn't be on your engine....LOL
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Old 04-02-2007, 06:40 AM   #10  
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I first got a SSAC on ebay for my SR20 S14, and with the turbo I had it hit the master cylinder- badly, I was gonna have to re-weld the flange at another angle and then it would be a ***** to make the DP... So I saw another top-mount on ebay, not a SSAC but just some that a guy had made and they looked nice. It fit perfectly, and the welds look pretty good, not perfect though. The turbo is an SC61--

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